Association of Prenatal and Postnatal Exposures to Warm or Cold Air Temperatures with Lung Function in Young Infants

Ariane Guilbert, Ian Hough, Emie Seyve, Matthieu Rolland, Joane Quentin, Rémy Slama, Sarah Lyon-Caen, Itai Kloog, Sam Bayat, Valérie Siroux, Johanna Lepeule

פרסום מחקרי: פרסום בכתב עתמאמרביקורת עמיתים

תקציר

Importance: Little is known about long-term associations of early-life exposure to extreme temperatures with child health and lung function. Objectives: To investigate the association of prenatal and postnatal heat or cold exposure with newborn lung function and identify windows of susceptibility. Design, Setting, and Participants: This population-based cohort study (SEPAGES) recruited pregnant women in France between July 8, 2014, and July 24, 2017. Data on temperature exposure, lung function, and covariates were available from 343 mother-child dyads. Data analysis was performed from January 1, 2021, to December 31, 2021. Exposures: Mean, SD, minimum, and maximum temperatures at the mother-child's residence, estimated using a state-of-the-art spatiotemporally resolved model. Main Outcomes and Measures: Outcome measures were tidal breathing analysis and nitrogen multiple-breath washout test measured at 2 months of age. Adjusted associations between both long-term (35 gestational weeks and first 4 weeks after delivery) and short-term (7 days before lung function test) exposure to ambient temperature and newborn lung function were analyzed using distributed lag nonlinear models. Results: A total of 343 mother-child pairs were included in the analyses (median [IQR] maternal age at conception, 32 [30.0-35.2] years; 183 [53%] male newborns). A total of 246 mothers and/or fathers (72%) held at least a master's degree. Among the 160 female newborns (47%), long-term heat exposure (95th vs 50th percentile of mean temperature) was associated with decreased functional residual capacity (-39.7 mL; 95% CI, -68.6 to -10.7 mL for 24 °C vs 12 °C at gestational weeks 20-35 and weeks 0-4 after delivery) and increased respiratory rate (28.0/min; 95% CI, 4.2-51.9/min for 24 °C vs 12 °C at gestational weeks 14-35 and weeks 0-1 after delivery). Long-term cold exposure (5th vs 50th percentile of mean temperature) was associated with lower functional residual capacity (-21.9 mL; 95% CI, -42.4 to -1.3 mL for 1 °C vs 12 °C at gestational weeks 15-29), lower tidal volume (-23.8 mL; 95% CI, -43.1 to -4.4 mL for 1 °C vs 12 °C at gestational weeks 14-35 and weeks 0-4 after delivery), and increased respiratory rate (45.5/min; 95% CI, 10.1-81.0/min for 1 °C vs 12 °C at gestational weeks 6-35 and weeks 0-1 after delivery) in female newborns as well. No consistent association was observed for male newborns or short-term exposure to cold or heat. Conclusions and Relevance: In this cohort study, long-term heat and cold exposure from the second trimester until 4 weeks after birth was associated with newborn lung volumes, especially among female newborns..

שפה מקוריתאנגלית אמריקאית
עמודים (מ-עד)E233376
כתב עתJAMA network open
כרך6
מספר גיליון3
מזהי עצם דיגיטלי (DOIs)
סטטוס פרסוםפורסם - 17 מרץ 2023

ASJC Scopus subject areas

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