Using Eye Movements to Evaluate the Effect of Total Awake Time on Attention Maintenance and Hazard Anticipation in a Driving Simulator

Malek Hamid, Gautam Divekar, Avinoam Borowsky, Donald Fisher

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Driving while sleepy or drowsy are leading contributors to road crashes. Sleepiness and drowsiness usually occur at the end of a prolonged period of time during which an individual has been awake. Although these factors have been heavily researched, it is not clear how one of their primary causes, a prolonged total awake time (TAT), might affect driving skills such as attention maintenance and hazard anticipation, two skills that are crucial for safe driving. This study investigated how these two driving skills are affected by prolonged TAT, and if so to what extent. Eighteen experienced drivers completed two driving simulator evaluation sessions: pre-test and post-test. For all participants, the pre-test occurred during the morning hours approximately one hour after waking up. For six drivers the post-test occurred in the morning (Short-TAT group), for six after lunch (Lunch group; effect of post lunch dip group), and for six early in the evening (Long-TAT group). In each session, participants were asked to navigate a simulated world that included eight scenarios: four examined drivers’ attention maintenance abilities and four examined their hazard anticipation skills. While driving, all participants’ eye behaviors were measured. The results showed that Long-TAT drivers’ attention maintenance and hazard anticipation skills were compromised. Possible implications for road safety are then discussed.
Original languageAmerican English
Title of host publicationTransportation Research Board 92nd Annual Meeting
StatePublished - 2013

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