Two Measures of Bilingualism in the Memories of Immigrants and Indigenous Minorities: Crossover Memories and Codeswitching

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    Abstract

    Two indices of bilingualism, crossover memories and codeswitching (CS), were explored in five groups of immigrant (English–Hebrew, Georgian–Hebrew Russian–Hebrew) and indigenous bilinguals (Arabic–Hebrew, Hebrew–English). Participants recalled memories in response to cue words and then were asked to report the language of retrieval and provide a more elaborate narrative. More memories were ‘same language’ memories, recalled in the language of the experimental session/cue word, but as many as 48 % of the memories were crossovers, i.e. memories reported in a language other than the language of the session/cue word. In an effort to examine the ecological validity of the self-reported language of the memories, the frequency of CS in the elaborated narratives was investigated. For the entire sample, more CS was found for self-reported crossover memories in L2 sessions. In a further analysis of CS in crossover memories, collapsed across L1 and L2 sessions, significant differences emerged between immigrants and indigenous bilinguals. Differences between immigrant and non-immigrant bilinguals are discussed in terms of the role of activation in crossover memories.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)187-200
    Number of pages14
    JournalJournal of Psycholinguistic Research
    Volume44
    Issue number2
    Early online date9 Feb 2014
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Apr 2015

    Keywords

    • Bilingualism
    • Codeswitching
    • Crossover memories
    • Immigrants
    • Indigenous minorities

    All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

    • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
    • Language and Linguistics
    • Linguistics and Language
    • General Psychology

    Fingerprint

    Dive into the research topics of 'Two Measures of Bilingualism in the Memories of Immigrants and Indigenous Minorities: Crossover Memories and Codeswitching'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

    Cite this