The reimbursement process in three national healthcare systems: variation in time to reimbursement of pembrolizumab for metastatic non-small cell lung cancer

Sarah Sharman Moser, Frank Tanser, Nava Siegelmann-Danieli, Lior Apter, Gabriel Chodick, Josie Solomon

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

Abstract

In this article, we focus on the reimbursement process, and as an example, characterize the time to reimbursement of pembrolizumab, a PD-1 immune checkpoint inhibitor for treatment of metastatic NSCLC from publicly available websites, in three different healthcare systems: The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) in the UK, the Pharmaceutical Benefits Advisory Committee (PBAC) in Australia, and the National Advisory Committee for the Basket of Health Services in Israel, all who have publicly funded health systems which include drug coverage. Our study found that there are substantial differences in time to reimbursement of pembrolizumab for the same conditions in different countries, with NICE and The National Advisory Committee for the Basket of Health Services in Israel approving one condition at the same time, Israel approving two conditions earlier than NICE, and PBAC lagging behind for every condition. These differences could be due to the differences in health policy systems and the many factors that affect reimbursement. Comparing the reimbursement process between different countries can highlight the challenges facing their health systems in early adoption of new treatments.

Original languageAmerican English
Article number22
JournalJournal of Pharmaceutical Policy and Practice
Volume16
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Dec 2023

Keywords

  • Health policy
  • Lung cancer
  • Pembrolizumab
  • Reimbursement

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Health Policy
  • Pharmacy

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'The reimbursement process in three national healthcare systems: variation in time to reimbursement of pembrolizumab for metastatic non-small cell lung cancer'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this