The Psychology of Corporate Rights: Perception of Corporates’ vs. Individuals’ Rights to Religious Liberty, Free Speech, and Privacy

Avital Mentovich, Aziz Huq, Moran Cerf

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionpeer-review

Abstract

The Supreme Court continuously expands the scope of rights granted to corporations. While this tendency receives widespread media attention, little empirical research examines how people view corporate rights. This paper reports the first examination of this issue. We consider several types of rights (religious liberty, privacy, and free speech), several types of entities (a family business, a large corporation, for-profit and non-for-profit companies) and the identity of the right recipients (employees, owners, and the company itself). Results show significant discrepancies in the recognition of companies’ versus individuals’ rights that persisted across all rights, all entities, and across the ideological spectrum.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationThe American Psychology and Law Society (APLS) Annual Meeting (2015)
StatePublished - 2015
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Corporations
  • Political ideology
  • Rights

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Law
  • General Psychology

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