The four kingdoms and other chronological conceptions in the Book of Daniel

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

The four kingdoms scheme plays a prominent role in the book of Daniel itself, and lies at the foundation of Nebuchadnezzar’s dream in chapter 2 and Daniel’s vision in chapter 7. The motif of four earthly empires followed by a heavenly kingdom, whose roots can be traced to surrounding cultures, serves both chronological and ideological-theological functions within Dan-iel itself. In the current study, I want to focus on the former, and place it in the larger context of chronological conceptions throughout the book as a whole. At the same time, the discussion of the ideological worldview of the Danielic authors will be discussed as it relates to these chronological con-ceptions. All of the chronological schemes in Daniel to be discussed here share a number of basic features, although specific aspects and emphases vary from chapter to chapter. It will be suggested that one aspect, common to the chronological worldview of most early Jewish and Christian apoca-lypses is in fact not present in all of the Daniel apocalypses, and this in fact serves as a litmus test for the milieu and historical background in which they were composed.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationFour Kingdom Motifs Before and Beyond the Book of Daniel
Place of PublicationLeiden
Pages13-38
Number of pages26
ISBN (Electronic)9789004443280
DOIs
StatePublished - 2021

Publication series

NameThemes in biblical narrative
PublisherBrill
Volume26

RAMBI publications

  • rambi
  • Apocalypse -- Biblical teaching
  • Bible -- Daniel -- II -- Criticism, interpretation, etc
  • Bible -- Daniel -- VII -- Criticism, interpretation, etc
  • History -- Biblical teaching
  • Kings and rulers -- Biblical teaching
  • Time perception -- Biblical teaching

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