The Effect of the Subjective Holocaust Influence Level on Holocaust Survivors’ Offspring

Gila Oren, Tal Shavit

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

This paper examines how is the Subjective Holocaust Influence Level (SHIL) of Holocaust survivors’ offspring (HSO) is reflected in their daily life, habits and wellbeing. For this purpose, we asked 346 Jewish-Israeli HSO about their daily life, habits and emotions and divided them into three groups based on their SHIL. We find that higher SHIL correlated with increased worry, being more suspicious of others, higher anxiety about the future, feeling a need to survive, risk aversion, self-rated health and unwillingness to discard food. However, we found only a minor effect on their financial behavior.

Original languageAmerican English
Pages (from-to)767-781
Number of pages15
JournalJournal of Loss and Trauma
Volume26
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jan 2021

Keywords

  • Holocaust
  • offspring
  • second generation
  • trauma
  • wellbeing

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Social Psychology
  • Phychiatric Mental Health
  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'The Effect of the Subjective Holocaust Influence Level on Holocaust Survivors’ Offspring'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this