The Effect of Mechanical Circulatory Support on Blood Flow in the Ascending Aorta: A Combined Experimental and Computational Study

Sapir Hazan Shenberger, Idit Avrahami

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Percutaneous mechanical circulatory support (MCS) devices are designed for short-term treatment in cases of acute decompensated heart failure as a bridge to transplant or recovery. Some of the known complications of MCS treatments are related to their hemodynamics in the aorta. The current study investigates the effect of MCS on the aortic flow. The study uses combined experimental and numerical methods to delineate complex flow structures. Particle image velocimetry (PIV) is used to capture the vortical and turbulent flow characteristics in a glass model of the human aorta. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analyses are used to complete the 3D flow in the aorta. Three specific MCS configurations are examined: a suction pump with a counterclockwise (CCW) rotating impeller, a suction pump with a clockwise (CW) rotating impeller, and a discharge pump with a straight jet. These models were examined under varying flow rates (1–2.5 L/min). The results show that the pump configuration strongly influences the flow in the thoracic aorta. The rotating impeller of the suction pump induces a dominant swirling flow in the aorta. The swirling flow distributes the incoming jet and reduces the turbulent intensity near the aortic valve and in the aorta. In addition, at high flow rates, the local vortices formed near the pump are washed downstream toward the aortic arch. Specifically, an MCS device with a CCW rotating impeller induces a non-physiological CCW helical flow in the descending aorta (which is opposite to the natural helical flow), while CW swirl combines better with the natural helical flow.

Original languageEnglish
Article number238
JournalBioengineering
Volume11
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2024

Keywords

  • aortic flow
  • CFD
  • percutaneous MSC
  • PIV
  • TKE

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Bioengineering

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