Starting a conversation: The place of managers in opening discussions in communities of practice

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionpeer-review

Abstract

Online communities of practice are becoming significant discursive arenas in many organizations. Much literature about online communities depicts them as peer-based environments based on user-generated content, where community members take a central role in starting conversations. The current study shifts the focus from community members into managers, and asks who starts conversations in communities of practice, and if there are differences between discussions opened by managers and by community members in terms of scope, topics of discussion, engagement and level of participation. Findings demonstrate the importance of managers in starting conversations and setting the discursive environment of communities of practice.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationElectronic Participation - 6th IFIP WG 8.5 International Conference, ePart 2014, Proceedings
EditorsEfthimios Tambouris, Ann Macintosh, Frank Bannister
Pages38-51
Number of pages14
ISBN (Electronic)9783662449134
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014
Event14th European Conference on Evolutionary Computation in Combinatorial Optimization, EvoCOP 2014 - Granada, Spain
Duration: 23 Apr 201425 Apr 2014

Publication series

NameLecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics)
Volume8654

Conference

Conference14th European Conference on Evolutionary Computation in Combinatorial Optimization, EvoCOP 2014
Country/TerritorySpain
CityGranada
Period23/04/1425/04/14

Keywords

  • Communities of practice
  • Conversations
  • Engagement
  • Managers
  • Online discussions
  • Social media

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Theoretical Computer Science
  • General Computer Science

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