Pigeons at the edge of the empire: Bioarchaeological evidences for extensive management of pigeons in a Byzantine desert settlement in the southern Levant

Nimrod Marom, Baruch Rosen, Yotam Tepper, Guy Bar-Oz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Metric data of 6th century CE pigeons from the Negev Desert, Israel, are employed to test competing hypotheses on flock management strategies: that directed selection for size or shape took place under intensive management; or, alternatively, that stabilizing selection was a stronger determinant of size and shape under extensive management conditions. The results of the analysis support the second hypothesis by demonstrating that the Byzantine Negev pigeons were like wild pigeon (Columba livia) in shape, albeit small-sized. The inferred extensive management system is then discussed in the context of pigeon domestication and human micro-ecologies in marginal regions.

Original languageAmerican English
Article numbere0193206
JournalPLoS ONE
Volume13
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2018

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • General

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