Physical and mental health correlates of perceived financial exploitation in older adults: Preliminary findings from the Finance, Cognition, and Health in Elders Study (FINCHES)

Gali H. Weissberger, Laura Mosqueda, Annie L. Nguyen, Anya Samek, Patricia A. Boyle, Caroline P. Nguyen, S. Duke Han

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objectives: Financial exploitation (FE) in old age is poorly understood, particularly among those without significant cognitive impairment. The Finance, Cognition, and Health in Elders Study (FINCHES) aims to identify factors associated with FE among cognitively-healthy older adults. Preliminary findings regarding physical and mental health correlates in the pilot phase of FINCHES are reported. Method: Sixteen older adults who self-reported FE were demographically-matched on age, education, sex, and race/ethnicity to eighteen older adults who did not report past FE. Results: Those who believed they were exploited endorsed significantly greater symptoms of depression (p = 0.014) and marginally greater symptoms of anxiety (p = 0.062). Participants trended towards lower perceived successful aging (p = 0.094). Perceived FE participants also endorsed greater medical conditions (p = 0.047), but follow-up individual item analyses suggest that this was driven by problems with sleep (p = 0.030). Conclusions: These preliminary findings from the pilot phase of FINCHES highlight negative mental health factors associated with perceived FE among cognitively-intact older adults.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)740-746
Number of pages7
JournalAging and Mental Health
Volume24
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - 3 May 2020
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Financial exploitation
  • aging
  • mental health
  • physical health
  • sleep

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Geriatrics and Gerontology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Gerontology
  • Phychiatric Mental Health

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