Mudtariban maǧnūnan: A Case of Phraseology and Evolving Motifs of Literary and Medical Love-Sickness in the Tale of Salāmān and Absāl

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Abstract

The Tale of Salaman and Absal presented as a translation from Greek, attributed in the text's opening lines to .unayn b. Is.aq, is saturated with references from a wideranging variety of sources with an array of religious, cultural and textual orientations; these, as well as its generic affiliations, ideological leanings, location on the spiritualmetaphysical spectrum and Vorlagen have been studied by many. In this paper, I focus on the wording and literary forms of the text, some of which have been glossed over in the rendition of Henry Corbin, by which this text is often known. My point of departure is a collocation which draws on motifs and phraseology from popular sources, the canons of poetry and poetry in prose (including belles lettres elements in the Qurān), as well as terminology in medical literature in Arabic and Greek traditions. Through an analysis of phrasing drawing on philological methods of Blachere, Von Grunebaum, Arazi and others, a contextualization of this Tale (which is not covered in research on "profane love theory" e.g. by Lois Giffen) may lead to a reading of this Hermetic text within a repertoire of "romantic" commonplaces and innovations of expression.

Original languageAmerican English
Pages (from-to)219-251
Number of pages33
JournalArabica
Volume61
Issue number3-4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014

Keywords

  • Corbin
  • Greek
  • Hunayn b. Ishaq
  • Salaman and Absal
  • Yusuf
  • displaced erotic wording
  • išq
  • popular literature
  • pulse lore
  • tašbib

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Cultural Studies
  • Language and Linguistics
  • Religious studies
  • Literature and Literary Theory

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