Maternal genetic variation accounts in part for the associations of maternal size during pregnancy with offspring cardiometabolic risk in adulthood

Pandora L. Wander, Hagit Hochner, Colleen M. Sitlani, Daniel A. Enquobahrie, Thomas Lumley, Gabriela M. Lawrence, Ayala Burger, Bella Savitsky, Orly Manor, Vardiella Meiner, Stephanie Hesselson, Pui Y. Kwok, David S. Siscovick, Yechiel Friedlander

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: Maternal pre-pregnancy body-mass index (ppBMI) and gestational weight gain (GWG) are associated with cardiometabolic risk (CMR) traits in the offspring. The extent to which maternal genetic variation accounts for these associations is unknown. Methods/Results: In 1249 mother-offspring pairs recruited from the Jerusalem Perinatal Study, we used archival data to characterize ppBMI and GWG and follow-up data from offspring to assess CMR, including body mass index (BMI), waist circumference, glucose, insulin, blood pressure, and lipid levels, at an average age of 32. Maternal genetic risk scores (GRS) were created using a subset of SNPs most predictive of ppBMI, GWG, and each CMR trait, selected among 1384 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) characterizing variation in 170 candidate genes potentially related to fetal development and/or metabolic risk. We fit linear regression models to examine the associations of ppBMI and GWG with CMR traits with and without adjustment for GRS. Compared to unadjusted models, the coefficient for the association of a one-standard-deviation (SD) difference in GWG and offspring BMI decreased by 41% (95%CI -81%, -11%) from 0.847 to 0.503 and the coefficient for a 1SD difference in GWG and WC decreased by 63% (95%CI -318%, -11%) from 1.196 to 0.443. For other traits, there were no statistically significant changes in the coefficients for GWG with adjustment for GRS. None of the associations of ppBMI with CMR traits were significantly altered by adjustment for GRS. Conclusions: Maternal genetic variation may account in part for associations of GWG with offspring BMI and WC in young adults.

Original languageAmerican English
Article numbere91835
JournalPLoS ONE
Volume9
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 26 Mar 2014
Externally publishedYes

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • General

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