Functional Encryption for Randomized Functionalities in the Private-Key Setting from Minimal Assumptions

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

We present a construction of a private-key functional encryption scheme for any family of randomized functionalities based on any such scheme for deterministic functionalities that is sufficiently expressive. Instantiating our construction with existing schemes for deterministic functionalities, we obtain schemes for any family of randomized functionalities based on a variety of assumptions (including the LWE assumption, simple assumptions on multilinear maps, and even the existence of any one-way function) offering various trade-offs between security and efficiency. Previously, Goyal et al. (Proceedings of the 12th theory of cryptography conference (TCC), pp 325–351, 2015) constructed a public-key functional encryption scheme for any family of randomized functionalities based on indistinguishability obfuscation. One of the key insights underlying our work is that, in the private-key setting, a sufficiently expressive functional encryption scheme may be appropriately utilized for implementing proof techniques that were so far implemented based on obfuscation assumptions [such as the punctured programming technique of Sahai and Waters (Proceedings of the 46th annual ACM symposium on theory of computing (STOC), pp. 475–484, 2014)]. We view this as a contribution of independent interest that may be found useful in other settings as well.

Original languageAmerican English
Pages (from-to)60-100
Number of pages41
JournalJournal of Cryptology
Volume31
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jan 2018

Keywords

  • Functional encryption
  • Punctured programming
  • Randomized functionalities

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Software
  • Computer Science Applications
  • Applied Mathematics

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