Effects of Mood on Psychophysiological Detection of Concealed Information and the Relation to Self-Assessed Lying Ability

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Abstract

The present study examined the effects of mood on physiological responses in the Concealed Information polygraph Test and the relation to self-assessed lying ability. One hundred and eight undergraduate students self-assessed their lie-telling ability, committed a mock theft, and were asked to conceal information related to the crime. Participants were then divided into three equal groups: two groups were asked to provide a detailed written account of either a happy or sad event in order to induce a happy or sad mood, while the third group served as a neutral group. Participants then underwent a polygraph test and were asked to try to avoid detection. An induced happy or sad mood tended to lower relative skin conductance responses to critical (crime related) items and enhance relative cardiovascular responses. Relative respiration responses to critical items obtained for the sad mood condition were more robust than the ones obtained for the happy mood condition. Under induced sad and happy moods, those who self-rated their lie-telling ability as high showed enhanced cardiovascular responsivity to critical items. These results were limited to the initial phase of the test. We discussed possible motivational explanations and implications for the Concealed Information polygraph test.

Original languageEnglish
Article number291
JournalBrain Sciences
Volume13
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2023

Keywords

  • Concealed Information Test
  • mood
  • orientation
  • polygraph
  • self-assessed lying ability

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • General Neuroscience

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