Effects of Moderate Exercise Training on Spatial Behavior Among Old Mice - Preliminary Results

E. Carmeli, B. Imam, E. Kodesh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background:
Moderate exercise training has innumerable benefits on physical function, cognition and mental health. However, the effects of exercise training on anxiety reduction that results in increased physical activity is much less appreciated. The objective of this study was to examine the effects of moderate exercise training on anxiety-related behaviors that result in increased physical activity.

Methods:
Old (17 months) female mice (n=6), C57B6 were allocated to either a sedentary or a running group that underwent 12 weeks of treadmill running (20 minutes/day, 6 days/week). Anxiety-related behavior was assessed using an Open Field Test.

Results:
Moderate exercise training resulted in increased locomotion in the exercised group. These mice entered the 'inner zone' of the open field more frequently; b) exhibited higher movement velocity within the arena; c) traveled a longer distance; and d) spent less time at the corners of the open field.

Conclusion:
Our results indicate the beneficial effects of moderate exercise training on reducing anxiety-related behavior and triggering spatial behaviors in an Open Field Test among aged mice.
Original languageAmerican English
Pages (from-to)6-10
Number of pages5
JournalThe Open Rehabilitation Journal
Volume7
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Oct 2014

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