Early-life experience reorganizes neuromodulatory regulation of stage-specific behavioral responses and individuality dimensions during development

Reemy Ali Nasser, Yuval Harel, Shay Stern

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Early-life experiences may promote stereotyped behavioral alterations that are dynamic across development time, but also behavioral responses that are variable among individuals, even when initially exposed to the same stimulus. Here, by utilizing longitudinal monitoring of Caenorhabditis elegans individuals throughout development we show that behavioral effects of early-life starvation are exposed during early and late developmental stages and buffered during intermediate stages of development. We further found that both dopamine and serotonin shape the discontinuous behavioral responses by opposite and temporally segregated functions across development time. While dopamine buffers behavioral responses during intermediate developmental stages, serotonin promotes behavioral sensitivity to stress during early and late stages. Interestingly, unsupervised analysis of individual biases across development uncovered multiple individuality dimensions that coexist within stressed and unstressed populations and further identified experience-dependent effects on variation within specific individuality dimensions. These results provide insight into the complex temporal regulation of behavioral plasticity across developmental timescales, structuring shared and unique individual responses to early-life experiences.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere84312
JournaleLife
Volume12
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2023

Keywords

  • C. elegans
  • early-life experience
  • individuality
  • long-term behavior
  • neuromodulation
  • neuroscience

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • General Immunology and Microbiology
  • General Biochemistry,Genetics and Molecular Biology
  • General Neuroscience

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