Disrupted maternal communication and disorganized attachment in the Arab society in Israel

Inbar Ariav-Paraira, David Oppenheim, Abraham Sagi-Schwartz, Ghadir Zreik

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Disrupted maternal communication during mother-infant interaction has been found to be associated with infants’ disorganized attachment, but has been studied primarily in North American and European samples and not in Arab samples. To address this gap the study examined the association between disrupted maternal communication and infant attachment in a sample of 50 Arab mothers and their one-year-old infants in Israel. Attachment was assessed with the Strange Situation Procedure (SSP), and disrupted communication with the AMBIANCE. Disrupted communication was higher in mothers of infants with disorganized and ambivalent attachment than in mothers of securely attached infants. The findings support the link between disrupted communication and disorganized attachment in the Arab society in Israel and add to our understanding of maternal behavior associated with ambivalent attachment.

Original languageAmerican English
Pages (from-to)335-347
Number of pages13
JournalInfant Mental Health Journal
Volume44
Issue number3
Early online date13 Mar 2023
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2023

Keywords

  • Attachement ambivalent
  • Attachement désorganisé
  • Communication perturbée
  • Comportement maternel
  • Culture
  • Gestörte Kommunikation
  • Kultur
  • afectividad ambivalente
  • afectividad desorganizada
  • ambivalent attachment
  • ambivalente Bindung
  • comportamiento materno
  • comunicación interrumpida
  • cultura
  • culture
  • desorganisierte Bindung
  • disorganized attachment
  • disrupted communication
  • maternal behavior
  • mütterliches Verhalten

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

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