Decolonizing the Study of Palestine: Indigenous Perspectives and Settler Colonialism after Elia Zureik

Ahmad H. Sa’di, Nur Masalha

Research output: Book/ReportBookpeer-review

Abstract

Writing about Palestine and the Palestinians continue to be controversial. Until the late 1980s, the question of Palestine was approached through Western social theories that had appeared after World War 2. This endowed European settlers and colonists the mission of guiding the "backward" natives of Palestine to modernity. However, since the work of Palestinian scholar Elia Zureik, the study of Israel, and the "ethnic relations" in Palestine-Israel has been radically shifted. Building on Zureik's work, this book studies the colonial project in Palestine and how it has transformed Palestinians' lives. Zureik had argued that Israel was the product of a colonization process and so should be studied through the same concepts and theorization as South Africa, Rhodesia, Australia, and other colonial societies. He also rejected the moral and civilizational superiority of the European settlers. Developing this work, the contributors here argue that colonialism is not only a political-economic system but also a "mode of life" and consciousness, which has far-reaching consequences for both the settlers and the indigenous population. Across 13 chapters (in addition to the introduction and the afterward), the book covers topics such as settler colonialism, dispossession, the separation wall, surveillance technologies, decolonisation methodologies and popular resistance. Composed mostly of Palestinian scholars and scholars of Palestinian heritage, it is the first book in which the indigenous Palestinians not merely "write back", but principally aim to lay the foundations for decolonial social science research on Palestine.

Original languageAmerican English
PublisherBloomsbury Publishing Plc.
Number of pages349
ISBN (Electronic)9780755648313
ISBN (Print)9780755648344
StatePublished - 1 Jan 2023

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • General Arts and Humanities
  • General Social Sciences

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Decolonizing the Study of Palestine: Indigenous Perspectives and Settler Colonialism after Elia Zureik'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this