Correlation between kinetic and kinematic measures, clinical tests and subjective self-evaluation questionnaires of the affected upper limb in people after stroke

Ronnie Baer, Ronit Feingold-Polak, Daniel Ostrovsky, Ilan Kurz, Shelly Levy-Tzedek

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Introduction: Assessment of stroke recovery should include multiple sources of information in order to obtain a complete understanding of the individual’s rehabilitation progress. Self-evaluation questionnaires’ scores do not always correspond to the scores of commonly used clinical evaluation tools. The purpose of this study was to assess the relationship between self-evaluation questionnaires, clinical tests, and kinematic and kinetic analyses of the affected upper limb after stroke, and to determine the correlation between these measures and self-reported general function 2–4 years after the stroke. Methods: Twenty-six subjects recovering from stroke were included in the study. Spearman’s correlation coefficient was used to measure the correlation between Stroke Impact Scale (SIS), Motor activity Log (MAL), Fugl-Meyer Assessment (FMA) and Action Reach Arm Test (ARAT) scores, and kinematic and kinetic analyses. A logistic regression was used to assess the extent to which these measures may predict the participants’ functional self-reported status 2–4 years post stroke. Results: Sections regarding hand function, hand force and general ADL of the self-evaluation questionnaires correlated with kinematic variables. However, only questionnaires that focus on hand function correlated with clinical tests. Mean and maximal hand velocity had the strongest correlations with self-evaluation questionnaires and with the clinical tests, more than other kinematic variables. Self-evaluation questionnaires and clinical tests were found to be correlated with hand kinetic metrics force-to-time ratio and number of force peaks. SIS hand force domain, mean velocity and maximal velocity predicted self-reported general function 2–4 years after the stroke. Conclusion: Self-evaluation questionnaires should be considered for wider use in the clinical evaluation of a patient’s stroke recovery, since they add important information on the individual’s functional status, which is not reflected in the clinical tests.

Original languageAmerican English
Article number1264513
JournalFrontiers in Neuroscience
Volume17
DOIs
StatePublished - 4 Dec 2023

Keywords

  • clinical test
  • kinematics
  • kinetics
  • self-evaluation questionnaires
  • stroke

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • General Neuroscience

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