Cervical adenosquamous carcinoma: detailed analysis of morphology, immunohistochemical profile, and clinical outcomes in 59 cases

Simona Stolnicu, Lien Hoang, Orsolya Hanko-Bauer, Iulia Barsan, Cristina Terinte, Anna Pesci, Sarit Aviel-Ronen, Takako Kiyokawa, Isabel Alvarado-Cabrero, Esther Oliva, Kay J. Park, Robert A. Soslow

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Although 2014 World Health Organization criteria require unequivocal glandular and squamous differentiation for a diagnosis of cervical adenosquamous carcinoma, in practice, adenosquamous carcinoma diagnoses are often made in tumors that lack unequivocal squamous and/or glandular differentiation. Considering the ambiguous etiologic, morphological, and clinical features and outcomes associated with adenosquamous carcinomas, we sought to redefine these tumors. We reviewed slides from 59 initially diagnosed adenosquamous carcinomas (including glassy cell carcinoma and related lesions) to confirm an adenosquamous carcinoma diagnosis only in the presence of unequivocal malignant glandular and squamous differentiation. Select cases underwent immunohistochemical profiling as well as human papillomavirus (HPV) testing by in situ hybridization. Of the 59 cases originally classified as adenosquamous carcinomas, 34 retained their adenosquamous carcinoma diagnosis, 9 were reclassified as pure invasive stratified mucin-producing carcinomas, 10 as invasive stratified mucin-producing carcinomas with other components (such as HPV-associated mucinous, usual-type, or adenosquamous carcinomas), and 4 as HPV-associated usual or mucinous adenocarcinomas with benign-appearing squamous metaplasia. Two glassy cell carcinomas were reclassified as poorly differentiated usual-type carcinomas based on morphology and immunophenotype. There were significant immunophenotypic differences between adenosquamous carcinomas and pure invasive stratified mucin-producing carcinomas with regard to HPV (p < 0.0001), PAX8 (p = 0.038; more in adenosquamous carcinoma), p40 (p < 0.0001; more in adenosquamous carcinoma), p63 (p = 0.0018; more in adenosquamous carcinoma) and MUC6 (p < 0.0001; less in adenosquamous carcinoma), HNF-1beta (p = 0.0023), vimentin (p = 0.0003), p53 (p = 0.0004), and CK7 (p = 0.0002) expression. Survival outcomes were similar between all groups. Adenosquamous carcinomas should be diagnosed only in the presence of unequivocal malignant glandular and squamous differentiation. The two putative glassy cell carcinomas studied did not meet our criteria for adenosquamous carcinoma, and categorizing them as such should be reconsidered.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)269-279
Number of pages11
JournalModern Pathology
Volume32
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Feb 2019
Externally publishedYes

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine

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