A Nuphar lutea plant active ingredient, 6,6′-dihydroxythiobinupharidine, ameliorates kidney damage and inflammation in a mouse model of chronic kidney disease

Daniel Landau, Jannat Khalilia, Eden Arazi, Ana Foigelman Tobar, Daniel Benharroch, Avi Golan-Goldhirsh, Jacob Gopas, Yael Segev

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) associated complications are associated with increased inflammation through the innate immune response, which can be modulated with anti-inflammatory agents. An active ingredient derived from the Nuphar lutea aquatic plant, 6,6′-dihydroxythiobinupharidine (DTBN) has anti-inflammatory properties, mainly through the inhibition of NF-κB. We tested the effects of DTBN on mice with CKD. After preliminary safety and dosing experiments, we exposed 8 weeks old male C57BL/6J mice to adenine diet to induce CKD. Control and CKD animals were treated with IP injections of DTBN (25 μg QOD) or saline and sacrificed after 8 weeks. Serum urea and creatinine were significantly decreased in CKD-DTBN Vs CKD mice. Kidney histology showed a decrease in F4/80 positive macrophage infiltration, damaged renal area, as well as decreased kidney TGF-β in CKD-DTBN Vs CKD mice. Kidney inflammation indices (IL-1β, IL-6 and P-STAT3) were significantly decreased in CKD-DTBN as compared to CKD mice. DTBN treatment showed no apparent damage to tissues in control mice, besides a decrease in weight gain and mild hypoalbuminemia without proteinuria. Thus, DTBN significantly improved renal failure and inflammation indices in CKD mice. Therefore, this and similar substances may be considered as an additional treatment in CKD patients.

Original languageEnglish
Article number7577
JournalScientific Reports
Volume14
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Dec 2024

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • General

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'A Nuphar lutea plant active ingredient, 6,6′-dihydroxythiobinupharidine, ameliorates kidney damage and inflammation in a mouse model of chronic kidney disease'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this